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M/MC ID# TD USA 1173



English Title: Plain brain : Brain after ecstasy
Media Format: Stationery
Date: [2000]
Country: United States of America
Subjects: Drug Use and Abuse, Hotlines
Audience: General
Languages: English
Description: 15 x 11 cm. postcard. Front: normal brain scan at left; brain scan after ecstasy use at right; black and white text. Back: white background with black text.
Producers: National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Contact: United States National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
P.O. Box 30652
Bethesda, MD 20824-0652
United States of America

Phone: 1-888-NIH-NIDA|1-888-TTY.NIDA
Website: http://www.nida.nih.gov
Abstract: Back: "Ecstasy. A not so bright idea. The brain scans on the front of this card show the sharp difference in human brain function for an individual who has never used drugs and one who used the club drug Ecstasy (XTC, MDMA, Adam, etc.) many times, but had not used any drugs for at least 3 weeks before having the scan. The left, bright reddish half shows active serotonin sites in the brain. Serotonin... more
Abstract: Back: "Ecstasy. A not so bright idea. The brain scans on the front of this card show the sharp difference in human brain function for an individual who has never used drugs and one who used the club drug Ecstasy (XTC, MDMA, Adam, etc.) many times, but had not used any drugs for at least 3 weeks before having the scan. The left, bright reddish half shows active serotonin sites in the brain. Serotonin is a critical neurochemical that regulates mood, emotion, learning, memory, sleep, pain. The dark sections in the right half are serotonin sites that are not present even after 3 weeks without any drugs. In addition to these changes in serotonin sites, scientists have found that Ecstasy injures serotonin neurons. Although these can regrow, they don't grow back normally and might not grow back in the right location. For more facts about drug abuse and addiction, prevention, and treatment, in English or Spanish, call 1.888.NIH.NIDA (1.888.TTY.NIDA for the deaf) to order free fact sheets by fax or mail. Or check out our websites at http://www.drugabuse.gov, http://www.clubdrugs.org, or http://www.nida.nih.gov. Comments or inquiries? Mail to: NIDA Infofax, P.O. Box 30652, Bethesda, MD 20824-0652." less


Notes: See TD USA 1174 for Spanish version of this postcard.

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